SojournKids

A Parent's Influence

UncategorizedJared KennedyComment
  • An extensive study of 272, 400 teenagers conducted by USA Today Weekend Magazine found that 70 percent of teens identified their parents as the most important influence in their lives. Twenty-one percent said that about their friends (peers), and only 8 percent named the media (from Wayne Rice and David Veerman, Understanding Your Teenager, Lakeside, CA: Understanding Your Teenager Books, 1999, 118).
  • MVParents.com says, 'Nearly three out of four parents believe their children's friends and classmates have the most influence... Yet contrary to what parents think, kids say mom and dad have the biggest impact on the choices they make' (MVParents.com is a web site of the Coors Brewing Company).
  • In a national survey, 1, 129 middle school students were asked what the greatest influence in their life was, and parents topped the list.  The results were: parents--37 percent, friends--22 percent, church--11 percent, youth pastor--7 percent, and music--5 percent.  Adult volunteers, schoolteachers, culture, and the internet each scored 2 percent or less.  A national survey of 923 high school students yielded very similar results (Southern Baptist Convention survey, taken from www.sbcstudents.com/annualsurvey/2007ParentYouthRelationships.pdf).
  • MTV and the Associated Press released a study on influence of parents that said, "So you're between the ages of 13 and 24.  What makes you happy?  A worried, weary parent might imagine the answer to sound something like this: Sex, drugs, and a little rock 'n' roll.  Maybe some cash, or at least the car keys.  Turns out the real answer is quite different.  Spending time with family was the top answer to that open-ended question... Parents are seen as an overwhelmingly positive influence in the lives of most young people.  Remarkably, nearly half of teens mention at least one of their parents as a hero" ("MTV and the Associated Press Release Landmark Study of Young People and Happiness" at www.mtv.com/thinkmtv/research).

Research statistics found in Steve Wright and Chris Graves, ApParent Privelege, InQuest Publishing, 2008, pages 17-20.