SojournKids

Why Serve Every Week (Part 2: Ownership)

Ashley StevensonComment

I hate trash day. Something about going around and collecting trash at my residence seems so daunting (even though it takes me under 3 minutes). I spend more time thinking about how I don’t want to do it, than I do actually completing the task.

When Wednesday night rolls around and I begin to wrap up my day, the reminder of trash day can derail my evening. Sure, that sounds ridiculous (and it is), but it’s not part of my daily rhythm. It’s a detestable, sometimes “impossible” chore.  Perhaps if I took the trash out daily, it wouldn’t seem so insurmountable (however I won’t be exploring that possibility).

I don’t intend here to compare serving in SojournKids with detestable household chores, but rather the danger of anything seeming like an impossible chore when it isn’t a regular rhythm for us. Serving is no exception. If we are always under the impression that “I’m just filling a slot once a month,” or “if I’m not there, someone else will be,” it is hard to experience joyful ownership in what we are doing. We will easily start to view our role as insignificant.

Sure, serving in Sojournkids is sometime hard, sometimes smelly, sometimes loud, sometimes thankless work. And you may be questioning, “is this even useful?” Know that your presence is valuable and your time matters.  

When a parent is able to confidently step away from their little one after months of struggle because “Mrs Lynn makes her feel so comfortable”, and they are able to enjoy the gift that is corporate worship and refreshment with their spouse, know that your time matters. 

When a three-year old comes an grabs on to your leg in the church lobby because they are thrilled to see you, or when a preschooler joyfully repeats gospel truth out loud even though their heart doesn’t yet believe, know that your time matters. When a kindergartener talks their parent’s ear off all the way out of the church building about what they learned about the bible, or when they sit at the dinner table midweek sharing with their parents about how “Miss Maddi gives me goldfish and tells me about Jesus,” know that your time matters.

When a 5th grader and asks for her SojournKids teacher to read her testimony and story of God’s transforming work at her baptism alongside her parents, or a 3rd grader asks your advice about dealing with bullies at school in a way that honors Jesus, know that your time matters. Read part 1 of this series on serving weekly here.

Click here to join our team and begin serving every week.